Kelinci Hutan
29 December 2013 @ 10:12 pm
I am in the Seattle Airport (in Washington, bastion of left-wing crazies), cheerfully browsing Jill Stanek's blog. I'm fixing to click over to Live Action.

I feel so subversive and counter-cultural. I suppose this state did turn me into a hipster. :D
 
 
Mood: tired
Location: West Coast Sky-Port 2
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
So, I'm in Chick-fil-A. I love Chick-fil-A. They're tasty and their chicken biscuits are awesome.

But their wi-fi has a filter that blocks some sites. It blocks FFN as a "porn site." Which, to be fair, is not entirely wrong. But it also blocks LifeSiteNews as an "abortion site." LiveAction too. Both of which are staunchly pro-life sites.

I'm thinking some fine tuning is in order.
 
 
Mood: amused
Location: Chick-fil-A
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
21 July 2013 @ 07:31 pm
So, backstory, my church burned down last Saturday. (I know, I know, I am the Master of Disaster. But seriously! It happened!)

Now, before I get into the rest of this post, let me say, that building was awesome. It was gorgeous. It had a nice color scheme. The library was full of books. The choir room made rehearsals sound so incredibly amazing that you would think our choir was three times the size that it is to hear us singing in there. Great building.

One little lightning strike, and now it's a total loss.

Now, that is deeply frustrating and sad and unfortunate. We're a close-knit church and we loved the building. And loosing the books in the library and pastor's offices was a big loss. But overall, nobody was hurt, and it's a building. It's a thing. We'll build a new one and we'll be okay. The church has good insurance and we're going to be fine. We've even got a new place to meet on Sundays until we build a new building.

Which brings me to the point of this post.

See, this morning during the pastoral prayer, our pastor said that we were "suffering." And I went, "Erm...we're not suffering that much."

See, this new place is not as nice as the one that burned down (well, it's nicer than that one now, but before the fire, there was no comparison). It's only got one bathroom. The floors are kind of uneven. We're all sitting in plastic chairs instead of pews, so there's no place to put hymnbooks and the pews were much more comfy. And nicer looking. The pastor/pianist/choir space is up on a stage instead of a dais so they feel farther away.

Gee. How awful.

This building has air conditioning. We all fit into the auditorium. We have a bathroom. We weren't sitting on the floor. There are walls. The roof doesn't leak. And it isn't made out of corrugated tin, so if it had started to rain, I still could've heard the pastor. Come to that, we have a sound system, so you can hear the pastor in the back. Compared to some of the places that our Christian brothers and sisters meet in every Sunday, as their regular buildings, this building is a palace. There are people I've met who would fall on their knees in tears to be holding services in a building as nice as this one. And this is, for us, a step back from our usual building. And a temporary step back at that. Heck, whatever we build to replace the building we lost will probably be even nicer. We have been, and remain, a congregation with remarkable material blessings.

When the building burned down, that was suffering. But right now, where we are, that isn't. That's just inconvenience. And who doesn't need a little bit of that every so often?
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Music: "Be Thou My Vision" by Carlton Forrester
Mood: thankful
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
22 November 2012 @ 10:10 am
I am not thankful today. It's not like I don't have a lot to be personally thankful for. I am visiting family. I have food. I have enough money to visit family. I have warm clothes and a place to sleep that isn't rainy and I have a cat that I love. I have a job. I am reading a good book. I'm a million miles behind on my NaNovel, but I've enjoyed what I've written so far.

But I'm not thankful.

Two of my dearest friends just had a baby. He came about three months early. And he's dying. He is not yet dead, but apparently the doctors do not expect that to be true for very long. I feel guilty for being charmed by my neice when my friends are about to loose their child. I feel like it's selfish to be happy when people I love are so sad. As a result, despite having a lot to be thankful for, I don't feel thankful. I am aware of the ways in which I'm fortunate, but that's all I can manage today.

I hope everyone reading this is having a happier holiday than I am right now.
 
 
Location: Bradford Cottage
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
10 November 2012 @ 08:58 am
So, last night I scored my very first ever traffic ticket. Busted tag light. The cop who pulled me over was very amicable and so, while I am disappointed to be leaving the People Who Have Never Had Tickets club, it could have been a lot worse.

But, as the cop was chatting with me he found out where I work. And said he'd been thinking about going to eat there. And I, feeling that one should encourage business at one's own place of work as a matter of routine, encouraged him to do so. So here I am, sitting in my car with my very first traffic ticket ever, trying to talk the guy giving it to me into coming to the restaurant.

My life is so weird.
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Mood: surreal
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
27 August 2012 @ 09:38 am
This has nothing to do with the entry.  It's just fun. :)My church just finished holding a "history conference." Over the weekend, Dr. David Calhoun from Covenant Seminary in Missouri visited and gave a series of talks on John Calvin. One on Saturday, the sermon on Sunday, a Sunday school class on Sunday, and the evening sermon on Sunday. Basically, it was Calvinism history central.

Which was interesting, for sure, but I thought it was more interesting that people showed up for this stuff. I mean, me, I'm a total dork. But even Saturday night, we got the sanctuary a good 50% full. And Sunday morning and evening was packed out.

In fact, Sunday morning, I remember coming down after singing to sit down for the sermon. By the time we all sorted ourselves out, my pew had about six people on it. Four of us were young adult age, all sitting together. And I remember looking across the row, noting that we all had our Bibles out, and three of us had notebooks and pens and were scribbling various notes here and there as we went.

Two thoughts occurred to me as this happened. First, is this just how people my age relate to learning things? We see/hear something interesting that we want to think about or whatever, and our first instinct is to catch it somehow. Video it, record it, write it down. Get it where it can't get away. Or has this just always been the case? (I don't think there's any big existential meaning behind the answer to this question. I'm just curious.)

Second, this is normal church for me, but how normal is it? Do people usually take notes? Young people? Do they keep their notes, like I do, in case they want to go over them later? Maybe I'm totally wrong, but I feel like this is unusual. I think most people would find a church with people busily scribbling sermon outlines into notebooks to be very strange. It's odd for me to think of this as odd, but I suspect that it is.

It was a good weekend, though. I learned a lot about Calvin (the guy), and the journey of the Calvinist theology from Geneva to Alabama. I just wish I could gauge my experience in terms of how unusual/ordinary it is. Not because I want to change how my church does things, but because I'm just curious how strange this really is.
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
I am, right now, still looking for a job and I have to say it's getting frustrating. I know I'll find something sooner or later as long as I keep looking, but I just...wish it were sooner. Especially with Sis getting married and me still short a bridesmaid's dress. :(

In the meantime, I'm working on a Sherlock/HP crossover fic which is coming along. I'm about to start writing on it for the day.

Which is really about all the news I have at the moment. So...hi to LJ, I suppose. *waves*
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Mood: okay
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
20 March 2011 @ 05:45 pm
Mostly I'm just making this post because I haven't posted to the journal for a while.

But...I am finally reading The Iliad after owning the book for several years and finding the Roman names for the characters way too off-putting to go through it. However, aside from the lamentable Roman naming, I'm enjoying it so far. Paris and Zeus are getting on my nerves, but that's to be expected from them.

My weekend of having the house to myself ends tonight. Aw, well. Fun while it lasted. :)
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Mood: good
Music: "Raise Your Head Up" by Pimp Code
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
Last night, I was having a conversation with my family that--somehow--meandered over to asking permission from a girl's father to date her. The title quote was what my mother said to me on the subject.

My response to this is a flat no. More than that, as I said to Mom at the time, if any guy I'm interested ever does ask my parents permission to date me, I don't care if they say yes or no. I'm done with him forever at that second. It is a categorical deal-breaker.

Mom did not look very satisfied with this response, but since obviously I don't care whether my parents give permission on this issue, her disapproval isn't going to change my mind any. However, it's irritated me enough that I'm going to lay out my reasons against this particular piece of cultural idiocy for anyone who cares to read it.

First off, this practice, as it functions in our culture, is a blatant double-standard. I'm not expected to ask the parents of any men I'm interested their permission to date him, but he's expected to ask my parents' permission to date me? Why? How does that make any sense? This might, arguably, make a little sense if I were still a teenager, but there I'd be arguing that it ought to go both ways. To an adult woman, this is an excuse to treat her like a child, but the same cannot be said of the adult man in this situation. Double-standard, double-standard, double-standard.

Next, this carries within it an implicit disregard for a woman's intelligence. Obviously men can be trusted to make reasoned, intelligent decisions about the people they wish to date. Women, on the other hand, clearly can't be, therefore it must be up to their parents--specifically their fathers--to point them in the right direction and only grant access to approved males.

On top of that, this confers an authority to both a woman's parents and to her suitors that I don't think they should have. Honestly, I don't even see that there's Biblical support for this (I'm not going to go into this, though, unless someone asks). Simply put, no one gets to decide who any woman is or is not right for except for that woman.

Lastly, it absolves women of responsibility for making one of the biggest decisions in their lives. If things go well, then it's a good thing her parents gave this guy permission, isn't it? And if they go wrong, well, it's not entirely her fault; he did have permission after all. Now, this one might seem like a minor reason when stacked up against the first three, but I feel it's at least as important as the previous ones I mentioned being as it reinforces all of them. Clearly women can not be trusted to make these decisions, so their families have to make it for them. This decision is such a big deal that women shouldn't carry this responsibility! They can't! It's just so big! You can't do it all by yourself! You would fail without our help!

Gee, I've heard that line before used by people most of the "Ask Permission" proponents would be ashamed of agreeing with. And it's completely wrong then, too.

So, in sum, screw that. I'm not jumping on this bandwagon.
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Mood: irritated
Music: "Harry Sees Dragons" from Goblet of Fire
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
05 May 2010 @ 07:52 pm
So, [livejournal.com profile] crisiks has talked me into doing a meme that involves actually recording me talking some. Now you will know what I sound like IRL! AUGH! Also, it took me forever to upload this file since I don't like LJ's voice post system and so I had to find somewhere to upload a media file. Blah. The questions for the meme are posted below.

Click on Me!

Voice posts are fun, right? You get to hear funny accents if your friends are from far, far away. All we really want is to hear your voice, we don't care what you're saying. So here's a list of typical meme questions that would otherwise be boring, but when communicated aloud - well, it's entertaining. Answer these questions in your post, and encourage others with voice-posting abilities to do the same.

1) What's your name?
2) How old are you?
3) Where are you from? Are you living there right now?
4) Is it cold where you are?
5) What's the time?
6) What are you wearing?
7) What was the last thing you listened to?
8) What was the last thing you ate?
9) What was the last thing you watched on tv?
10) What's your favorite tv show? Why?
11) Quick! Find a book, or something with text on it! Flip to a random page and read some of it! GO!
12) What was the last movie you saw? How was it?
13) Do YOU think you have an accent? Talk about that.
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
Mood: good
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
06 April 2010 @ 10:16 pm
So...my house caught fire this morning.

No, my house actually caught on actual fire this morning. Which I am saying because it's terribly dramatic and you almost never get to say that. For the full story...

My mom is coming back from Indonesia today, so I wanted to wash her sheets and comforter (which is really just the polite thing anyway), so I had finished with her comforter and had just thrown her sheets into the dryer and turned it on. I went to go stick some dishes in the dishwasher, and as I had just finished loading that, I started hearing some weird noises from the front of the house.

I go to investigate. When I enter the laundry room, I find flames (of about three inches tall at the tallest, but still) on the ironing board and a towel and sweatshirt that were on it, and the fuse box smoking. I since they were still little flames, I patted out the sweatshirt, the towel, and the ironing board and peeled open the fuse box. And then heard crackling inside the wall.

AUGH!

It was at this point I decided that the fire department should get involved, so I put on some real clothes in under five seconds (since this happened at about 8 AM, and I was still in PJs), I called 911 and they sent some fire trucks.

The good news? We lost a towel and need to repaint the wall. And that's it. The house is still standing, my cat is alive, and now I know what I would save in a fire. My Bible and my scarf project.
 
 
Mood: shock and awe
Location: Ivy Manor
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
02 February 2010 @ 01:35 pm
Woot! I have made the podcast! You can listen to Josh, Carrie, and Liz discuss my email on the LifeReport podcast now, if you like. Mine is the very last one of the show.
 
 
Location: Ivy Manor
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
24 November 2009 @ 03:36 pm
I was, earlier, looking at my copy of Switchfoot's Nothing Is Sound album and thinking about the lyrics to "The Shadow Proves The Sunshine." And I love that song because it's fun and all, but also because the title is kind of telling. Shadows can't exist without sunshine. Sunshine is totally fine without shadows.

Which is my whole problem with moral dualism, where you would say that "good can't exist without evil." This is something C.S. Lewis wrote about a lot, and even Tolkien slipped it into Lord of the Rings. But to boil the problem with this assertion down, everything morally wrong is a perversion of a moral good or moral neutral. Stealing is a perversion of just wanting something. Revenge is a perversion of justice. Hatred is a perversion of anger (which is not morally wrong on its own). However, all those good things can stand on their own. People can want and get things without being thieves. Justice is carried out without being revenge. Anger occurs without hatred. Evil's existence requires good to be present. Good's existence is under no such constraints.

But I realized today that the same problem exists with existential dualism, where you might say that "you can't truly appreciate being happy unless you've been truly sad."

Yes, you can.

This problem happens on two levels. First off, lots of people are happy without suffering to get there. In fact, people who go through episodes of major depression are more likely to go through another later on, not less. Clearly being sad does not help one to be more happy in the future.

Second, when you're really, properly happy, you're not thinking about how horrible [experience] was. It's a poor sort of happiness in which you must constantly remind yourself to enjoy it as much as possible because things have sucked in the past/will suck in the future. That's a buzz-kill more than anything else. It certainly doesn't make things more cheerful, or help you better appreciate good moments. To be properly happy, you don't need anything but to be happy. And if you've been sad in the past, a really, genuinely good moment won't be one where you're constantly bouying yourself up with subconscious reminders that this experience is so much better than that other experience. It will be one that drives the sad experience out of your head entirely for a time.

So no, you don't need sad to properly appreciate happy. You don't need depressed to properly appreciate joyful. You don't need evil to have good.
 
 
Mood: philosophical
Location: Underground
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
29 October 2009 @ 09:30 pm
More like one, actually. NaNoWriMo starts on Sunday! Yikes! Granted, I have an ending for my story now, and a fair idea of how I'm going to get there, so that's good, but even so...

Novembers are so much more interesting since I've discovered NaNo. :)
 
 
Mood: excited
Location: Ivy Manor
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
13 October 2009 @ 05:17 pm
So, I finally got the stuff I need at work to actually make the video I've been quietly panicking over for the past week. Hooray! And it looks totally makable, so hopefully I'll get that finished out tomorrow morning. *crosses fingers and toes* Then it just needs to get fact-checked and approved by teh boss-peoples.

And, NaNoWriMo is winding up again. I've only switched my idea once so far, which is a good sign, I think. Anyone curious to see a synopsis of what I have planned may go to my profile and click on "Novel Info" for the skinny.

Write Or Die is going to be my BFF again. :)
 
 
Mood: busy
Location: Ivy Manor
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
The Ultra, Mega, Condensed, Cliff Notes Version is as follows:

1. Lolita joins GAFF at some point in the past.
2. Lolita makes up ALF and posts "her" stories to GAFF. Lulz are had.
3. Guru announces GAFF is going away and Lolita sees the end of the lolcow, so she creates the House of Bad Fanfiction, and the GAFFers move in.
4. The Housemates spend some time mocking ALF some more, helped along by TheDogLady and JasonFontaine. TDL and Jason are both Lolita's sockpuppets. Eventually, though, that drama is spent. Even when TDL "dies" (according to Lolita), it doesn't really revive.
5. Enter Dan Lirette. He apparently is a real person, and just as bad as we've been saying, but in him Lolita sees the potential for more dramaz.
6. Lolita starts feeding Dan Lirette info about SA. She also feeds SA info about Dan Lirette. This pisses off "the goons," who begin digging into her. IP numbers and so forth. Apparently trolling SA is SRS BSNS.
7. Around this time Lolita floats a rumor that JasonFontaine is Dan Lirette in real life. The Suspension of Disbelief for most Housemates does not go that far given that this would mean Lirette knows ALF and family IRL and had been marking this website since long before he'd even been on our radar. Many, many people (myself not among them) begin to ask Lolita how she knows all this stuff and why she's always ready with a story to answer all the questions.
8. Theweirdkind's account is stolen by Lolita around the same time as #7. Someone sees two people in the chatbox discussing how best to troll us using her account and posts this to Miscellaneous (now "The Lounge"). Theweirdkind's account is returned. When theweirdkind checks her message inbox, a whole slew of PMs about how to troll The House are discovered. Even more questions ensue.
9. Lolita disappears due to "family business" and leaves her account information with Verandering. Someone called JackNapier shows up and basically says what I just did in 1-8, only he took about a day to do it. According to JackNapier, SA blackmailed her into trolling for them. Also, an ED article on Lolita is revealed and is set to be featured in just a few days.
10. Verandering does some reading, decides all this is sufficiently solid to believe and that odds are Lolita is what JackNapier says. He uses Lolita's account to take over, closes registration to prevent an invasion of trolls, and does some cosmetic work on the forums.
11. June 10, Lolita takes over Verandering's account and begins to change things again. Shisaiga gets wise to her gag from another forum, created by Nihilist and starts PMing people. Then those people start PMing people and everything goes bananas.
12. The chatbox is deleted. InkWeaver and Zeiss Manifold begin bringing as many people as they can over to the new forums. Then forums begin to be locked for admin-only access. People start flooding to Nihilist's forum.
13. All the regular forums go down and "The Notice Board" goes up. Kittenmommy informs everyone that they are all horrible people for believing bad things about Lolita. She is ignored and nobody comes to play with her.
14. June 11. Kittenmommy opens up one forum for posting, where the majority of ex-Housemates say, "Just let us save our snarks." The rest of the boards are opened for the duration of about one hour.
15. Epic copypasta.
16. The board goes down. In all probability forever.

THE END?
 
 
Mood: laughing
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
10 April 2009 @ 03:27 pm
Today the guy from Jeff Sessions office returned my call and said that he's actually put some effort into trying to track down how many red envelopes were recieved by the White House. (!!!) Apparently the White House is not releasing that information (at least, not yet), even to people on "the Hill." (Shock, shock.) His theory was that they either don't feel like telling people, or the rather more mundane explanation that the mail hasn't quite gotten through screening yet (personally, I think the former is more fun, but the latter is more probable).

He also, very kindly, gave me a phone number to call. It is, unfortunately, the same number for the White House switchboard that I already have (darn!), but at least he tried. He also said that they were in support of the efforts of the project. Given Senator Sessions' leanings, I can't say I'm surprised.

So, my calling the Communications Office got nowhere (they may not pick up calls refered from the switchboard, or perhaps they were just busy), but I'll call them again on the other side of the weekend. In the meantime, still no official word on the internets beyond some guy who supposedly works in the mailroom named "Steve."

Go Jeff-Sessions'-staff-dude, though.

In other news, it's Good Friday and I'll be singing at services later on tonight.
 
 
Location: The Solarium
Mood: happy
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
08 April 2009 @ 02:15 pm
So, I did the Red Envelope day last Tuesday and I've been watching the news since to see if it got covered anywhere. Since the only place I've seen any numbers was in WorldNewsDaily (they say the White House has recieved at least 3.25 million red envelopes and that they're still coming in). WND is not the most reliable source, so I have gone looking for more official confirmation.

I called the White House switchboard and got referred to the Comments line. I called Mike Rogers office (mostly in case they could suggest someone better to call) and they suggested I call the White House. I called Richard Shelby's office and got a busy signal (apparently call waiting is not Senator Shelby's platform). I called Jeff Sessions office and left a message for their "guy who handles these things." Whatever that means. I emailed the White House and heaven knows how long it will take for them to get back to me.

Huh.

I am calling the switchboard tomorrow and asking for the Communications Office. I'll see if that one goes any better.
 
 
Mood: determined
Music: Batman - one of the many
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
10 March 2009 @ 10:53 pm
I have no idea why it seems important to me to post this, but I feel that I want to and so here we are.

I just added another bookmark into my Bible, which brings the total number of bookmarks I have in it up to four. Each one of them is a bit fun, I think, and I get a bit of satisfaction from having added a new one. I am organized and on top of things and able to quickly access the parts of my Bible that I will soon be returning to in the future.

Yay! (If you don't take joy in the little things, then you'll be waiting around forever to find things to take joy in, I feel. :)

Except that with my desire to get back on writing the Numbers book, I realized that there are instances where a bookmark will help you not at all. Like with the Numbers story. Because to get the information I will need, I'll be flipping around hither, thither, and yon in the book. And while a bookmark gets you to a certain point quickly, it also commits you to that spot. "Hitherto shalt thou come, and no other," says the bookmark. So I would be constantly moving it around, unable to decide where the bookmark should best be placed. The first of the pages I'd need? The current one? The most middle? The most frequently required? I suppose I could use a bookmark that covered several pages together. And a paperclip would probably be the most effective way to do that, but I can't put a paperclip in a Bible! That seems so tacky in my head.

I found a scenario in which a bookmark is completely unhelpful. Who could have imagined such a thing?
 
 
Mood: tired
 
 
Kelinci Hutan
As a last update on the when-will-it-be-done question, the book is done. I wrote the words "The End" on December 3. The trouble is, now over half the people who claimed to want to read it when it was finished have not made it very easy for me to let them do so. Why is that? I do not know.

But the book is in the hands of...four other people now, and I hope that they like it at least a little. *crosses fingers*

Now, on to Gus. Who is Gus, you ask? Colonel Gus (long story) is my cat. And he is weird because he is not a carnivore.

No, really. I have a non-carnivorous cat. He'll eat dry catfood, mac & cheese, popcorn, and dry ramen noodles (Indo-Mie? I love Indo-Mie!). He will not eat turkey, hot dogs, beef, or chicken. He'll smell them, and then kind of back off and look at me with this hurt expression on his face. As if I am mortally injuring him by eating something that he does not really want to bum off me.

A cat that eats no meat. Go figure. At least I won't have to worry about him hiding dead mice around the place.
 
 
Location: Underground
Mood: nervous